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Amount of training effects in representationmediated food aversion learning: No evidence of a role for associability changes

Authors
  • Holland, Peter C.1
  • 1 Johns Hopkins University, 204 Ames Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD, 22128 , Baltimore
Type
Published Article
Journal
Learning & Behavior
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2005
Volume
33
Issue
4
Pages
464–478
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3758/BF03193185
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Rats acquired aversions to food pellets when a previously trained signal for that food was paired with a toxin, but only after minimal signal—food training. After extensive signal—food training, signal—toxin pairings had no effect on food consumption even after manipulations that enhanced the associability of the signal. By contrast, conditioned responding to the signal retained its sensitivity to devaluation of the food reinforcer by food—toxin pairings after extensive training. These results suggest that the nature of associatively activated event representations changes over the course of training.

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