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Alternative splicing and its regulatory role in woody plants.

Authors
  • Chen, Mo-Xian1, 2, 3
  • Zhang, Kai-Lu1
  • Zhang, Min1
  • Das, Debatosh4
  • Fang, Yan-Ming1
  • Dai, Lei2
  • Zhang, Jianhua4
  • Zhu, Fu-Yuan1
  • 1 Co-Innovation Center for Sustainable Forestry in Southern China, College of Biology and the Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China. , (China)
  • 2 Shenzhen Institute of Synthetic Biology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055, China. , (China)
  • 3 Southern Regional Collaborative Innovation Center for Grain and Oil Crops in China, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, 410128, China. , (China)
  • 4 Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, and State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin 999077, Hong Kong. , (Hong Kong SAR China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Tree Physiology
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Oct 29, 2020
Volume
40
Issue
11
Pages
1475–1486
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tpaa076
PMID: 32589747
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Alternative splicing (AS) is an important post-transcriptional process to enhance proteome diversity in eukaryotic organisms. In plants, numerous reports have primarily focused on AS analysis in model plant species or herbaceous plants, leading to a notable lack of research on AS in woody plants. More importantly, emerging evidence indicates that many important traits, including wood formation and stress resistance, in woody plants are controlled by AS. In this review article, we summarize the current progress of all kinds of AS studies in different tree species at various stages of development and in response to various stresses, revealing the significant role played by AS in woody plants, as well as the similar properties and differential regulation within their herbaceous counterparts. Furthermore, we propose several potential strategies to facilitate the functional characterization of splicing factors in woody plants and evaluate a general pipeline for the systematic characterization of splicing isoforms in a complex AS regulatory network. The utilization of genetic studies and high-throughput omics integration approaches to analyze AS genes and splicing factors is likely to further advance our understanding of AS modulation in woody plants. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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