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Altered functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens subdivisions in amphetamine-type stimulant abusers: a resting-state fMRI study

Authors
  • Wang, Yun1, 2
  • Yan, Kai-Juan1, 2
  • Fan, Chen-Xiao3
  • Luo, Xiao-Nian1, 2
  • Zhou, Yuan1, 2, 4, 5
  • 1 Beijing Anding Hospital, Beijing, China , Beijing (China)
  • 2 Capital Medical University, Beijing, China , Beijing (China)
  • 3 The Second Hospital of Jinhua City, Jinhua, Zhejiang, China , Jinhua (China)
  • 4 Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China , Beijing (China)
  • 5 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China , Beijing (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMC Neuroscience
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Dec 30, 2019
Volume
20
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s12868-019-0548-y
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundThe growing abuse of amphetamine-type stimulants leads to new challenges to human health. A possible addiction mechanism has been proposed by altered functional architecture of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) during resting state. NAc contains different subdivisions and they may play different roles in addiction. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there are common or distinct patterns of functional connectivity of the NAc subdivisions in amphetamine-type stimulant abusers (ATSAs).MethodsThe present study recruited 17 male ATSAs and 22 healthy male controls. All the subjects underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with their eyes closed. The NAc was divided into core-like and shell-like subdivisions. We used seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) analyses to identify differences in brain functional architecture between ATSAs and healthy controls (HCs).ResultsATSAs had lower positive RSFCs with all of the NAc subdivisions over the left orbital part of superior frontal gyrus and higher positive RSFCs with the NAc subdivisions over the left opercular part of inferior frontal gyrus than HCs, which indicates common abnormalities across the NAc subdivisions in ATSAs. In addition, the RSFCs between the NAc subdivisions and the left orbital part of superior frontal gyrus were negatively correlated with the addiction severity in ATSAs.ConclusionThese results provide evidence that there are common RSFC patterns of the NAc subdivisions in ATSAs. The abnormality indicated by disrupted functional connectivity between the NAc subdivisions and prefrontal cortex suggests abnormal interaction between the rewarding process and cognitive control in ATSAs. Our results shed insight on the neurobiological mechanisms of ATSA and suggest potential novel therapeutic targets for treatment and intervention of ATSAs.

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