Affordable Access

Alteration in sensory nerve function following electrical shock.

Authors
  • Abramov, G S
  • Bier, M
  • Capelli-Schellpfeffer, M
  • Lee, R C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Burns
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1996
Volume
22
Issue
8
Pages
602–606
Identifiers
PMID: 8982537
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A study of the effects of electrical shock on peripheral nerve fibres is presented. Strength and duration of the applied shocks were similar to those encountered in a typical industrial electrical accident. The purpose of this study is: (i) to identify the electrophysiological and morphological change in nerve fibres after the application of electrical current shocks; (ii) to examine the ability of the peripheral nerve fibres to spontaneously regain function and; (iii) to demonstrate the usefulness of the sensory refractory spectrum as an additional technique in assessing the damage. Three groups of animals received twelve 4-ms electric field pulses of approximately 37 V/cm (n = 5), 75 V/cm (n = 9) and 150 V/cm (n = 6), respectively. Group 4 was a control group and received a direct application of 2 per cent lidocaine over the sciatic nerve for 30 min. Thermal effects of the shocks were negligible. The sensory refractory spectrum shows that electrical shock damage was mainly to the large, fast myelinated fibres and that higher field strengths do more damage. Also in a histological examination it was found that the more heavily shocked myelinated fibres had sustained more damage.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times