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Alcoholic withdrawal syndrome and seizures.

Authors
  • Essardas Daryanani, H
  • Santolaria, F J
  • Gonzalez Reimers, E
  • Jorge, J A
  • Batista Lopez, N
  • Martin Hernandez, F
  • Martinez Riera, A
  • Rodriguez Rodriguez, E
Type
Published Article
Journal
Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire)
Publication Date
May 01, 1994
Volume
29
Issue
3
Pages
323–328
Identifiers
PMID: 7945573
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A study of 72 alcoholics, hospitalized for alcohol withdrawal syndrome, was undertaken to determine the incidence of seizures, their relationship with other withdrawal symptoms, the presence of brain atrophy and the relationship of this last with withdrawal intensity severity. Sixty-seven (93%) were male and the mean age was 44.9 +/- 1.3 (mean +/- SEM) years. Thirty-three (46%) of the 72 patients had seizures at admission, 10 of these developed minor withdrawal symptoms, in 18 delirium tremens ensued and 5 showed no symptoms of withdrawal. Thirty-nine (54%) had withdrawal syndrome without seizures. Twenty-one of these developed minor withdrawal syndrome and 18 delirium tremens. Seizures showed no relationship with the other withdrawal manifestations, and in all the cases preceded them. Our findings also show that alcoholics with seizures due to withdrawal are more prone to suffer seizures in their future withdrawal episodes, and that alcoholics who suffer morning withdrawal symptoms are prone to develop delirium tremens. In 46 patients a CT scan was performed. Though the alcoholics showed ventricular and sulcal enlargement, brain atrophy was similar when the seizure and non-seizure groups or those with and without delirium tremens were compared. However, cortical and ventricular atrophy were related to the existence of previous episodes of withdrawal syndrome [corrected].

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