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Alcohol sensitivity in women after undergoing bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study.

Authors
  • Acevedo, María Belén1
  • Teran-Garcia, Margarita2
  • Bucholz, Kathleen K3
  • Eagon, J Christopher4
  • Bartholow, Bruce D5
  • Burd, Nicholas A6
  • Khan, Naiman6
  • Rowitz, Blair7
  • Pepino, Marta Yanina8
  • 1 Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois.
  • 2 Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois; Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois.
  • 3 Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 4 Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 5 Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.
  • 6 Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois; Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois.
  • 7 Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois; Carle Foundation Hospital, Urbana, Illinois; Carle Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, Illinois.
  • 8 Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois; Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Surgery for obesity and related diseases : official journal of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery
Publication Date
Jan 23, 2020
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.soard.2020.01.014
PMID: 32075778
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG), the most common bariatric surgeries performed worldwide, increase the risk to develop an alcohol use disorder. This might be due, in part, to surgery-related changes in alcohol pharmacokinetics. Another risk factor, unexplored within this population, is having a reduced subjective response to alcohol's sedative effects. To assess whether the alcohol sensitivity questionnaire (ASQ), a simple self-report measure, could pinpoint reduced alcohol sensitivity in the bariatric population. University medical centers in Missouri and Illinois. Women who had RYGB (n = 16), SG (n = 28), or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery (n = 11) within the last 5 years completed the ASQ for both pre- and postsurgical timeframes, and 45 of them participated in oral alcohol challenge testing postsurgery. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and subjective stimulation and sedation were measured before and for 3.5 hours after drinking. In line with faster and higher peak BACs after RYGB and SG than laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery (P < .001), postsurgery ASQ scores were more reduced from presurgery scores after RYGB/SG than after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery (-2.3 ± .3 versus -1.2 ± .2; P < .05). However, despite the dramatic changes in BAC observed when ingesting alcohol after RYGB/SG surgeries, which resulted in peak BAC that were approximately 50% above the legal driving limit, a third of these women felt almost no alcohol-related sedative effects. Although RYGB/SG dramatically increased sensitivity to alcohol in all participants, meaningful interindividual differences remained. The ASQ might help identify patients at increased risk to develop an alcohol use disorder after surgery. Copyright © 2020 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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