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Air Pollution and Chronic Eye Disease in Adults: A Scoping Review.

Authors
  • Millen, Amy E1
  • Dighe, Shruti2
  • Kordas, Katarzyna1
  • Aminigo, Boma Zelma1
  • Zafron, Michelle L3
  • Mu, Lina1
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
  • 2 Department of Family Medicine, Allegheny Health Network Saint Vincent, Erie, PA, USA.
  • 3 Health Sciences at Abbott Library, University Libraries, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ophthalmic Epidemiology
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
31
Issue
1
Pages
1–10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09286586.2023.2183513
PMID: 36864662
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

We conducted a scoping review of studies examining ambient air pollution as a risk factor for chronic eye disease influencing the lens, retina, and intraocular pressure in adults. Terms related to air pollution and eye disease outcomes were used to search for publications on Embase, Web of Science Core Collection, Global Health, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1, 2010, through April 11, 2022. We identified 27 articles, focusing on the following non-mutually exclusive outcomes: cataract (n = 9), presbyopia (n = 1), retinal vein occlusion or central retinal arteriolar and venular equivalents (n = 5), intraocular pressure (IOP) (n = 3), glaucoma (n = 5), age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (n = 5), diabetic retinopathy (n = 2), and measures of retinal morphology (n = 3). Study designs included cross-sectional (n = 16), case-control (n = 4), and longitudinal (n = 7). Air pollutants were measured in 50% and 95% of the studies on lens and retina or IOP, respectively, and these exposures were assigned to geographic locations. Most research was conducted in global regions with high exposure to air pollution. Consistent associations suggested a possibly increased risk of cataract and retina-associated chronic eye disease with increasing exposure to particulate matter (PM2.5-PM10), NO2, NOx, and SO2. Associations with O3 were less consistent. Accumulating research suggests air pollution may be a modifiable risk factor for chronic eye diseases of the lens and retina. The number of studies on each specific lens- or retina-related outcome is limited. Guidelines regarding the role of air pollution in chronic eye disease do not exist.

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