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Aggressive Salivary Malignancies at Early Stage: Outcomes and Implications for Treatment.

Authors
  • Eppsteiner, Robert W1
  • Fowlkes, Jonathan W1
  • Anderson, Carryn M2
  • Robinson, Robert A3
  • Pagedar, Nitin A1
  • 1 1 Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
  • 2 2 Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
  • 3 3 Pathology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of Otology Rhinology & Laryngology
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2017
Volume
126
Issue
7
Pages
525–529
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0003489417702655
PMID: 28474964
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Few studies have examined whether the use of adjuvant treatment impacts survival for early stage high-grade salivary tumors. A retrospective review of the SEER database between 1973 and 2012 was performed. Patients with high-grade major salivary gland tumors including salivary duct carcinoma, carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma, high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma, or adenocarcinoma, NOS were identified. Only stage I-II tumors were included. The impact of radiation status on observed and relative survival was examined. Five hundred seventy-four patients with high-grade, early stage salivary tumors met inclusion criteria. Sixty-seven percent of patients received radiation therapy. There was no difference in observed or relative survival based on having received radiation. Adjuvant radiation is indicated for advanced stage tumors or early stage tumors with adverse features. For early stage tumors without adverse features, there was no survival benefit from radiation therapy. Adjuvant radiation should be decided on a case-by-case basis for these patients.

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