Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Age-related hearing loss and provider-patient communication across primary and secondary care settings: a cross-sectional study.

Authors
  • Smith, Simon1
  • Manan, Nur Syifa Ilyani Abd1
  • Toner, Shannon1
  • Al Refaie, Amr2
  • Müller, Nicole2
  • Henn, Patrick3
  • O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P1
  • 1 Medical Education Unit, School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 2 Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 3 ASSERT, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. , (Ireland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Age and Ageing
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Aug 24, 2020
Volume
49
Issue
5
Pages
873–877
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afaa041
PMID: 32253433
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The prevalence of age-related hearing loss (ARHL) increases with age. Older adults are amongst the most dependent users of healthcare and most vulnerable to medical error. This study examined health professionals' strategies, as well as level of formal training completed, for communication with older adults with ARHL, and their views on the contribution of ARHL to suboptimal quality of patient care. A 17-item questionnaire was distributed to a sample of Irish primary care physicians, as well as hospital-based clinicians providing inpatient palliative care and geriatric services. A total of 172 primary care physicians and 100 secondary care providers completed the questionnaire. A total of 154 (90%) primary and 97 (97%) secondary care providers agreed that ARHL had a negative impact on quality of care. Across both settings, 10% of respondents reported that communication issues contributed to multiple medication error events each year. Although only 3.5% of secondary care providers and 13% of primary care physicians attended formal training on communication with hearing-impaired patients, 66.5% of respondents were confident in their capacity to communicate with these patients. Primary care physicians reported that they either never used assistive hearing technology (44%) or were unfamiliar with this technology (49%). Primary and secondary care health providers reported that ARHL reduces patient care quality and may initiate errors leading to patient harm. Formal training addressing the communication needs of ARHL patients appears to be underdeveloped, and there is a limited familiarity with assistive hearing technology. This is both an error in health professional training and healthcare services. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: [email protected]

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times