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Age and Sex Differences in Load‐Induced Tibial Cortical Bone Surface Strain Maps

Authors
  • Carriero, Alessandra1
  • Javaheri, Behzad2
  • Bassir Kazeruni, Neda3
  • Pitsillides, Andrew A4
  • Shefelbine, Sandra J5
  • 1 The City College of New York, USA , (United States)
  • 2 School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, City University of London, UK , (United Kingdom)
  • 3 Imperial College London, UK , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Royal Veterinary College, UK , (United Kingdom)
  • 5 Northeastern University, USA , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
JBMR Plus
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Publication Date
Feb 16, 2021
Volume
5
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/jbm4.10467
PMID: 33778328
PMCID: PMC7990149
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Original Articles
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

Bone adapts its architecture to the applied load; however, it is still unclear how bone mechano‐adaptation is coordinated and why potential for adaptation adjusts during the life course. Previous animal models have suggested strain as the mechanical stimulus for bone adaptation, but yet it is unknown how mouse cortical bone load‐related strains vary with age and sex. In this study, full‐field strain maps (at 1 N increments up to 12 N) on the bone surface were measured in young, adult, and old (aged 10, 22 weeks, and 20 months, respectively), male and female C57BL/6J mice with load applied using a noninvasive murine tibial model. Strain maps indicate a nonuniform strain field across the tibial surface, with axial compressive loads resulting in tension on the medial side of the tibia because of its curved shape. The load‐induced surface strain patterns and magnitudes show sexually dimorphic changes with aging. A comparison of the average and peak tensile strains indicates that the magnitude of strain at a given load generally increases during maturation, with tibias in female mice having higher strains than in males. The data further reveal that postmaturation aging is linked to sexually dimorphic changes in average and maximum strains. The strain maps reported here allow for loading male and female C57BL/6J mouse legs in vivo at the observed ages to create similar increases in bone surface average or peak strain to more accurately explore bone mechano‐adaptation differences with age and sex. © 2021 The Authors. JBMR Plus published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

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