Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Age of First Walking and Associations with Symptom Severity in Children with Suspected or Diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Authors
  • Reindal, Lise1, 2
  • Nærland, Terje3, 4
  • Weidle, Bernhard5, 6
  • Lydersen, Stian5
  • Andreassen, Ole A4, 7
  • Sund, Anne Mari5, 6
  • 1 Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Møre og Romsdal Hospital Trust, Volda Hospital, Pb 113, 6101, Volda, Norway. [email protected] , (Norway)
  • 2 Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. [email protected] , (Norway)
  • 3 NevSom, Department of Rare Disorders and Disabilities, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 4 NORMENT Centre, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 5 Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 6 Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 7 Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
50
Issue
9
Pages
3216–3232
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10803-019-04112-y
PMID: 31278523
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Age of first walking (AOW) is reported to be later in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with typical development. However, the relationship between AOW and variations in ASD symptoms across different neurodevelopmental disorders is largely unknown. This study investigated AOW and its association with autism symptom severity in a large sample of children (N = 490, 23% females) clinically evaluated for suspected ASD, differentiated into ASD (n = 376) and non-ASD (n = 114) diagnoses. Children with ASD achieved independent walking significantly later than children with non-ASD diagnoses. AOW was significantly associated with ASD symptom severity, and females had a non-significant later AOW. The current findings suggest that in cases with delayed AOW, ASD should be considered as an actual differential diagnosis, perhaps particularly in girls.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times