Affordable Access

Age differences in, and consequences of, multiple- and variable-strategy use on a multitrial sort-recall task.

Authors
  • Coyle, T R
  • Bjorklund, D F
Type
Published Article
Journal
Developmental psychology
Publication Date
Mar 01, 1997
Volume
33
Issue
2
Pages
372–380
Identifiers
PMID: 9147844
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Second-, 3rd-, and 4th-grade children were given 5 sort-recall trials with different sets of categorizable items. The authors assessed multiple-strategy use on each trial and related intertrial changes in strategy use to levels of recall. Multiple-strategy use increased with age but was observed at all grades. Fourth graders who used more strategies had higher recall, with this pattern occurring only on later trials for 2nd and 3rd graders. Children of all ages showed substantial intertrial variability in using multiple strategies. Stable-strategy use (few strategy changes across trials) was related to high levels of recall, both for individual and group data, and was associated with the use of different numbers of strategies at different ages. Results were interpreted in light of new research and theory postulating that multiple- and variable-strategy use is the rule rather than the exception in development and that strategies do not always facilitate task performance (utilization deficiencies).

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times