Affordable Access

Access to the full text

After the gun: examining police visits and intimate partner violence following incidents involving a firearm

Authors
  • Small, Dylan S.1
  • Sorenson, Susan B.2, 3
  • Berk, Richard A.1, 3, 4
  • 1 University of Pennsylvania, Department of Statistics, Wharton School, Philadelphia, PA, USA , Philadelphia (United States)
  • 2 University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy and Practice, 3815 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA , Philadelphia (United States)
  • 3 University of Pennsylvania, Ortner Center on Violence and Abuse in Relationships, 3815 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA , Philadelphia (United States)
  • 4 University of Pennsylvania, Department of Criminology, Philadelphia, PA, USA , Philadelphia (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Publisher
Springer US
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2019
Volume
42
Issue
4
Pages
591–602
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10865-019-00013-8
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Laws have been enacted to keep firearms out of the hands of abusers. In this study, we examined one such effort—removal of a firearm at the scene of intimate partner violence (IPV)—to assess the subsequent occurrence and number of IPV incidents responded to by police and subsequent risk of injury to the victim. Using the 28,977 IPV calls in one large U.S. city to which officers responded during the 2013 calendar year, we identified 220 first-time incidents in which offenders used (i.e., brandished, pistol whipped, shot) a pistol, revolver, rifle, or shotgun. Officers reported removing a firearm from 52 (24%) of the offenders. After using full propensity score matching to control for potential confounders, logistic and Poisson regressions were used to assess differences between those from whom a firearm was removed and those whose firearm was not removed. Firearm removal at the scene of an IPV incident appears to increase the likelihood of subsequent IPV reports to police and suggestive evidence that subsequent injury to the victim might increase as well. The offender shifting from threats with a firearm to physical violence and a change (an increase as well as a decrease) in victim willingness to summon police may account for the findings.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times