Affordable Access

Access to the full text

African traditional use of edible insects and challenges towards the future trends of food and feed

Authors
  • Kipkoech, C.
  • Jaster-Keller, J.
  • Gottschalk, C.
  • Wesonga, J.M.
  • Maul, R.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Insects as Food and Feed
Publisher
Wageningen Academic Publishers
Publication Date
Jul 03, 2023
Volume
9
Issue
8
Pages
965–988
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3920/JIFF2022.0076
Source
Wageningen Academic Publishers
Keywords
Disciplines
  • REVIEW ARTICLE
License
Green

Abstract

In the current times of climate change, the intense use of insects as a protein source is gaining popularity worldwide, and will likely contribute to increased nutrient intake in food and feed due to its nutritional, ecological, nutraceutical, and medicinal potential. Ancient traditional consumption of wild-harvested insects in Africa is a valuable but diminishing resource. There is a need for improved technology in insect rearing to match production with the current population pressure since we can no longer depend on wild collection. The current legislation within the European Union opens a pathway towards acceptance, increased consumption, and marketing of edible insects, which already had a big role in African nutrition as a portion of seasonal food. Food security and expensive animal protein sources are a setback in Africa and there is a need to search for alternative sources to curb malnutrition. Insect use in animal feed is gaining momentum in pig, fish, pet, and poultry feed. To meet the rising demand for insect protein in animal feed, it calls for new ways to increase availability while addressing food quality, safety, and environmental sustainability. Apart from their importance as a source of nutrients, insects help to recycle organic waste, and the remaining portion can be used in plant protection and as a soil modifier. This review, therefore, undertakes exploration and outlook on the ancient utilisation of edible insects in Africa, current efforts to improve through farming, and the challenges faced with the hope that traditional practices will shape the future of the edible insect industry.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times