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Affective response as a mediator of the association between the physical and social environment and physical activity behavior.

Authors
  • Boyle, Holly K1
  • Dunsiger, Shira I1, 2
  • Bohlen, Lauren Connell3
  • Emerson, Jessica A1
  • Lee, Harold H1
  • Stevens, Courtney J4
  • Williams, David M5
  • 1 Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 2 Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 3 Department of Kinesiology, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
  • 4 Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging, Geisel School of Medicine, Lebanon, NH, USA. , (Lebanon)
  • 5 Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of behavioral medicine
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
43
Issue
5
Pages
773–782
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10865-019-00118-0
PMID: 31734890
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Perceptions of the physical and social environment have been shown to be predictive of physical activity (PA) behavior. However, the mechanisms of this association have not been examined. Affective response to PA was examined as a putative mediator of the association between perceptions of the PA environment and subsequent PA behavior. As part of a PA promotion study, 59 low-active overweight or obese but otherwise healthy adults completed real-time assessments of the perceived physical and social PA environment, affective response to PA, and PA behavior over a 6-month period. As hypothesized, decreased latency to and greater duration of subsequent PA was predicted by engaging in PA with a partner (b = 17.24, SE = .45, p < .01), engaging in PA outdoors versus indoors (b = 3.70, SE = 0.67, p < .01), and perceived pleasantness of the physical (b = 0.59, SE = .17, p < .01) and social settings (b = 0.68, SE = .16, p < .01). Affective response to PA (a shift toward feeling good versus bad during PA) mediated the association between engaging in PA with a partner (a path: 0.53(.11), p < .01, b path: 0.42(.12), p < .01, ab path: 0.22(.08), 95% CI .09-.41) and perceived pleasantness of the physical (a path: .38(.02), p < .01; b path: .65(.23), p = .01; ab path: .25(.09), 95% CI .08-.43) and social setting (a path: .35(.02), p < .01; b path: .57(.23), p = .01; ab path: .20(.08), 95% CI .03-.37) and PA behavior, but not the association between engaging in PA outdoors versus indoors and PA behavior. These findings suggest that perceived environmental variables may have their effects on PA through the process of psychological hedonism.

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