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The affective profiles in the USA: happiness, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness-increasing strategies.

Authors
  • Schütz, Erica1
  • Sailer, Uta
  • Al Nima, Ali
  • Rosenberg, Patricia
  • Andersson Arntén, Ann-Christine
  • Archer, Trevor
  • Garcia, Danilo
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg , Gothenburg , Sweden ; Department of Psychology, Linneaus University , Kalmar , Sweden ; Network for Empowerment and Well-Being , Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
PeerJ
Publisher
PeerJ
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2013
Volume
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7717/peerj.156
PMID: 24058884
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Background. The affective profiles model categorizes individuals as self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The model has been used extensively among Swedes to discern differences between profiles regarding happiness, depression, and also life satisfaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate such differences in a sample of residents of the USA. The study also investigated differences between profiles with regard to happiness-increasing strategies. Methods. In Study I, 900 participants reported affect (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule; PANAS) and happiness (Happiness-Depression Scale). In Study II, 500 participants self-reported affect (PANAS), life satisfaction (Satisfaction With Life Scale), and how often they used specific strategies to increase their own happiness (Happiness-Increasing Strategies Scales). Results. The results showed that, compared to the other profiles, self-fulfilling individuals were less depressed, happier, and more satisfied with their lives. Nevertheless, self-destructive individuals were more depressed, unhappier, and less satisfied than all other profiles. The self-fulfilling individuals tended to use strategies related to agentic (e.g., instrumental goal-pursuit), communal (e.g., social affiliation), and spiritual (e.g., religion) values when pursuing happiness. Conclusion. These differences suggest that promoting positive emotions can positively influence a depressive-to-happy state as well as increasing life satisfaction. Moreover, the present study shows that pursuing happiness through strategies guided by agency, communion, and spirituality is related to a self-fulfilling experience described as high positive affect and low negative affect.

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