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Verification in computational structural mechanics: recovery-based a posteriori error estimation

Authors
Publisher
Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Icar/08 Scienza Delle Costruzioni
Disciplines
  • Computer Science
  • Engineering
  • Physics

Abstract

thesis04.dvi Verification in computational structural mechanics: recovery-based a posteriori error estimation by Giovanni Castellazzi Advisor: Prof. Ing. Francesco Ubertini co-Advisor: Ing. Stefano de Miranda Dottorato di Ricerca in Meccanica delle Strutture - XIX Ciclo Coordinatore: Prof. Ing. Erasmo Viola Settore scientifico disciplinare: Area 08 - Ingegneria civile e Architettura ICAR/08 - Scienza delle Costruzioni ALMA MATER STUDIORUM - University of Bologna Bologna, March 12th, 2007 “Verification in computational structural mechanics: recovery-based a posteriori error estimation,” a dissertation prepared by Giovanni Castellazziin partial fulfill- ment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, has been approved and accepted by the following: Prof. Elio Sacco Prof. Alessandro De Stefano Prof. Francesco Ubertini April 2007 Abstract Verification in computational structural mechanics: recovery-based a posteriori error estimation by Giovanni Castellazzi Dottorato di Ricerca in Meccanica delle Strutture - XIX Ciclo Coordinatore: Prof. Ing. Erasmo Viola Prof. Francesco Ubertini Ing. Stefano de Miranda ALMA MATER STUDIORUM - University of Bologna Computational engineering, the discipline concerned with the use of computational methods and devices to simulate physical events and engineering systems, is being heralded by many as one of the most important developments in recorded history. Computer predictions of physical events, it is argued, can be of enormous impor- tance in making critical decisions that affect every facet of human existence. As the speed and capacity of computer systems continue to grow, the expectations of users of computer models in decision making continues to grow in kind. Today, some look toward computer-based predictions as a means to obtain vital quan- titative information on events that influence the security, health, and well being of much of mankind and many nations and that influence the s

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