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Aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in children treated in hospital.

Authors
  • Korppi, M1
  • Heiskanen-Kosma, T
  • Jalonen, E
  • Saikku, P
  • Leinonen, M
  • Halonen, P
  • Mäkela, P H
  • 1 Department of Paediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland. , (Finland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
European journal of pediatrics
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1993
Volume
152
Issue
1
Pages
24–30
Identifiers
PMID: 8444202
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Viral and bacterial antigen and antibody assays were prospectively applied to study the microbial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in 195 hospitalised children during a surveillance period of 12 months. A viral infection alone was indicated in 37 (19%), a bacterial infection alone in 30 (15%) and a mixed viral-bacterial infection in 32 (16%) patients. Thus, 46% of the 69 patients with viral infection and 52% of the 62 patients with bacterial infection had a mixed viral and bacterial aetiology. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was identified in 52 patients and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 41 patients. The next common agents in order were non-classified Haemophilus influenzae (17 cases), adenoviruses (10 cases) and Chlamydia species (8 cases). The diagnosis of an RSV infection was based on detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal secretions in 79% of the cases. Pneumococcal infections were in most cases identified by antibody assays; in 39% they were indicated by demonstrating pneumococcal antigen in acute phase serum. An alveolar infiltrate was present in 53 (27%) and an interstitial infiltrate in 108 (55%) of the 195 patients. The remaining 34 patients had probable pneumonia. C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total white blood cell count were elevated in 25%, 40% and 36% of the patients, respectively. CRP was more often elevated in patients with bacterial infection alone than in those with viral or mixed viral-bacterial infections. No other correlation was seen between the radiological or laboratory findings and serologically identified viral, bacterial or mixed viral-bacterial infections.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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