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Aerobic power as a factor in women's response to work in hot environments.

Authors
  • Drinkwater, B L
  • Denton, J E
  • Kupprat, I C
  • Talag, T S
  • Horvath, S M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of applied physiology
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1976
Volume
41
Issue
6
Pages
815–821
Identifiers
PMID: 1002636
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Twelve young women, athletes (n = 6) and nonathletes (n = 6), walked on a treadmill at loads equivalent to approximately 30% Vo2 max for two 50-min periods in three environments: 1) 28 degrees C, 45% rh, 2) 35 degrees C, 65% rh, and 3) 48 degrees C, 10% rh. There were no differences between groups in rectal temperature, heart rate, evaporative heat loss, or mean skin temperature at 28 or 35 degrees C or during the first work period in the 48 degrees C environment. However, a significantly lower cardiac output (Q) and stroke volume (SV) observed for nonathletes by the 46th min of work at 48 degrees C may explain why no nonathletes were able to complete a 2nd h of work while four of six athletes successfully finished the period. It appears that in conditions of severe heat stress (48 degrees C) athletes were able to maintain a cardiac output sufficient to meet the metabolic requirements and the large increase in peripheral blood flow for a longer period of time than nonathletes.

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