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Advocacy group effects in global governance: populations, strategies, and political opportunity structures

Authors
  • Dellmuth, Lisa M.1
  • Bloodgood, Elizabeth A.2
  • 1 Stockholm University, Department of Economic History and International Relations, Stockholm, 10691, Sweden , Stockholm (Sweden)
  • 2 Concordia University, Department of Political Science, Montreal, QC, H3G2M8, Canada , Montreal (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Interest Groups & Advocacy
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Publication Date
Sep 16, 2019
Volume
8
Issue
3
Pages
255–269
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1057/s41309-019-00068-7
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Global governance is no longer a matter of state cooperation or bureaucratic politics. Since the end of the cold war, advocacy groups have proliferated and enjoyed increasing access to global governance institutions such as the European Union, World Trade Organization, and the United Nations climate conferences. This special issue seeks to push theories of interest groups and international non-governmental organizations forward. We argue that the advocacy group effects on global governance institutions are best understood by examining how groups use and shape domestic and global political opportunity structures. The individual articles examine how, when, and why domestic and global political opportunity structures shape advocacy group effects in global governance, across global institutions, levels of government, advocacy organizations, issue areas, and over time. As special interests are becoming increasingly involved in global governance, we need to better understand how advocacy organizations may impact global public goods provision.

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