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Advancing frontiers in anaesthesiology with laparoscopy.

Authors
  • Sood, Jayashree
Type
Published Article
Journal
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Publisher
Baishideng Publishing Group Co
Publication Date
Oct 21, 2014
Volume
20
Issue
39
Pages
14308–14314
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v20.i39.14308
PMID: 25339818
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The introduction of laparoscopy in the surgeon's armamentarium was in fact a "revolution in the history of surgery". Since this technique involves insufflation of carbon dioxide it produces several pathophysiological changes which have to be understood by the anaesthesiologist who can modify the anaesthesia technique accordingly. Advantages of laparoscopy include reduced pain, small scars and early return to work. Certain complications specific to laparoscopic surgery are due to carboperitoneum and increased intra-abdominal pressure. Venous air embolism, although very rare, can be lethal if not managed promptly. Other complications include subcutaneous emphysema, haemodynamic compromise and arrhythmias. Although associated with minimal postoperative morbidity, postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting can be quite problematic. The limitations of laparoscopy have been overcome by the introduction of robotic surgery. There are important implications for the anaesthesiologist during robotic surgeries which have to be practiced accordingly. Robotic surgery has a learning curve for both the surgeon and the anaesthesiologist. The robot is bulky, and cannot be disengaged after docking. Therefore it is important that the anaesthetized patient remains immobile throughout surgery and anaesthesia is reversed only after the robot has been disengaged at the end of surgery. Advances in laparoscopy and robotic surgery have modified anaesthetic techniques too.

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