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Adipokines promote chronic kidney disease.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation
1460-2385
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Volume
28 Suppl 4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gft191
PMID: 24179016
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The rapid growth in obesity worldwide contributes to an increase in metabolic syndrome and obesity-related kidney disease with an enhanced increased risk for chronic kidney disease, finally progressing to end-stage renal disease. Adipose tissue is a highly active endocrine organ secreting numerous factors that contribute to renal and cardiovascular complications. In renal damage, various adipokines are involved through mediating endothelial dysfunction, inducing oxidative stress and inflammation as well as stimulating renal sympathetic nervous activity, and it reduces cancellous bone but conversely increases cortical bone. Adipokines may also be involved in the development of renal anaemia. A balance exists between more protective adipokines (adiponectin) and factors mediating pathophysiological effects (angiotensin II, TNFα). Obesity may cause a disruption of this delicate balance, thereby inducing renal disease. Consequently, weight reduction and lifestyle changes affecting all components of the metabolic syndrome are essential to disrupt this vicious cycle.

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