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Adducts from in vivo action of the carcinogen 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide in rats and from in vitro reaction of 4-acetoxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide with DNA and polynucleotides.

Authors
  • Galiègue-Zouitina, S
  • Bailleul, B
  • Loucheux-Lefebvre, M H
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer research
Publication Date
Feb 01, 1985
Volume
45
Issue
2
Pages
520–525
Identifiers
PMID: 3917848
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In vivo 4-hydroxyamino[2-3H]quinoline 1-oxide-modified DNA and in vitro 4-acetoxyamino[2-3H]quinoline 1-oxide-modified DNA were enzymatically hydrolyzed, and the hydrolysates were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The two patterns were compared, and we showed that all of the high-performance liquid chromatography peaks which were recovered from in vivo-modified DNA were present in the hydrolysate of in vitro-modified DNA. Therefore, we used the in vitro 4-acetoxyamino[2-3H]quinoline 1-oxide-modified DNA to investigate the quinoline-purine adducts which are characteristics of the mode of action of the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. By comparison with the enzymatic hydrolysates of 4-acetoxyamino[2-3H]quinoline 1-oxide-modified covalent poly(deoxyadenylate-deoxythymidylate) X poly(deoxyadenylate-deoxythymidylate) and covalent poly(deoxyguanylate-deoxycytidylate) X poly(deoxyguanylate-deoxycytidylate) three nitroquinoline adducts were enumerated on the modified DNA. One of them was previously characterized as a C8-guanyl adduct. We proved that the two other are a guanine and an adenine adduct, respectively. A quinoline derivative was identified in the hydrolysates of the in vivo- and in vitro-modified DNAs as 4-aminoquinoline 1-oxide, the origin of which was postulated to be a degradation compound of one (or more) adduct(s). Moreover, the presence of two degradation compounds of the C8-guanyl adduct was shown in mild alkaline conditions. We suspected an imidazole ring-opened form.

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