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Adaptive Changes in the Self-Concept During a Life Transition.

Authors
  • Kling, Kristen C1
  • Ryff, Carol D1
  • Essex, Marilyn J1
  • 1 University of Wisconsin at Madison.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Personality & social psychology bulletin
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1997
Volume
23
Issue
9
Pages
981–990
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0146167297239008
PMID: 29506443
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Theories about the self-concept suggest that different aspects of the self are organized according to importance, or psychological centrality. The ways in which psychological centrality can change and how these changes are associated with psychological well-being were investigated in a sample of aging women who had experienced community relocation. The self-concept was measured before and after the move, with regard to five life domains (health, family, friends, economics, and daily activities). It was hypothesized that well-being is maximized by increasing the psychological centrality of life domains in which one is doing well and by lowering the psychological centrality of life domains in which one is doing poorly. The hypothesized, adaptive psychological centrality shifts emerged in the health and friends domains for select outcome measures. Centrality shifts with different patterns of directionality were observed for the other three domains and are interpreted as reflecting problem-focused coping.

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