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Adapting Personal Therapies Using a Mobile Application for Tinnitus Rehabilitation: A Preliminary Study.

Authors
  • Abouzari, Mehdi1
  • Goshtasbi, Khodayar1
  • Sarna, Brooke1
  • Ghavami, Yaser1
  • Parker, Erica M1
  • Khosravi, Pooya1, 2
  • Mostaghni, Navid1
  • Jamshidi, Shahrnaz1
  • Saber, Tina1
  • Djalilian, Hamid R1, 2
  • 1 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
  • 2 Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of Otology Rhinology & Laryngology
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2021
Volume
130
Issue
6
Pages
571–577
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0003489420962818
PMID: 33030042
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To develop a smartphone application providing sound therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating tinnitus and performing a proof-of-concept pilot study evaluating its potential efficacy. An interactive smartphone application available on iOS and Android platforms was developed, which provided an 8-week tinnitus-specific CBT and personalized and frequency-matched sound therapy. Included patients presented to our tertiary clinic between 2017 and 2018, while those waitlisted were regarded as controls. Three surveys were administrated: Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). A total of 30 patients enrolled in this study consisting of 20 treatment and 10 control patients and mean age was 55.4 ± 11.6 years. Treatment and control patients had similar age, sex, and pre-enrolment GAD and PSS (all P > .05). Baseline THI scores were also similar between treatment and control cohorts (50.1 ± 21.9 vs 62.0 ± 20.7; P = .15). After 8 weeks, though changes in GAD and PSS scores were similar (P > .05), the treatment group reported a significantly greater improvement in THI scores (17.7 ± 15.8 vs 5.3 ± 10.5, P = .04). This pilot study demonstrated potentially promising efficacy of a smartphone-based CBT and sound therapy platform for treating tinnitus and encourages future randomized controlled trials on this treatment modality.

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