Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Acute Photobiomodulation Does Not Influence Specific High-Intensity and Intermittent Performance in Female Futsal Players

Authors
  • dos Santos, Izabela Aparecida1,
  • Lemos, Marina de Paiva
  • Coelho, Vitória Helena Maciel
  • Zagatto, Alessandro Moura
  • Marocolo, Moacir2
  • Soares, Rogério Nogueira
  • Barbosa Neto, Octávio1
  • Mota, Gustavo R.1
  • 1 (G.R.M.)
  • 2 Physiology and Human Performance Research Group, Department of Physiology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora 360360-900, Brazil
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Oct 04, 2020
Volume
17
Issue
19
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph17197253
PMID: 33020394
PMCID: PMC7579062
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

The acute improvement of performance after photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been reported in different types of exercise. However, the effect on high-intensity and intermittent exercises that are relevant for team sports is unknown. Thus, we evaluated the effect of prior acute application of PBMT on high-intensity and intermittent exercise performance, muscle oxygenation, and physiological/perceptual indicators in amateur female futsal players. Thirteen players (24.1 ± 3.7 years) performed a testing battery (countermovement jump (CMJ), Illinois agility and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YYIR1)) preceded by 15 min of PBMT (1 min 30 s each muscular point; five muscular points in each lower limbs) or 15 min of placebo (SHAM), in a counterbalanced randomized cross-over design (one-week in-between PBMT/SHAM). All test performance did not differ ( p > 0.05) between PBMT and SHAM, as well as blood lactate, rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, and muscle oxygenation (via near infrared spectroscopy) responses. The acute application of PBMT prior to a physical testing battery does not influence high-intensity and intermittent exercises performance, neither physiological nor perceptual responses in amateur female futsal players.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times