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Acute effects of particulate matter with different sizes on respiratory mortality in Shenzhen, China.

Authors
  • Zhu, Feng1
  • Chen, Lan2
  • Qian, Zhengmin Min3
  • Liao, Yuxue4
  • Zhang, Zhen4
  • McMillin, Stephen Edward5
  • Wang, Xiaojie6
  • Lin, Hualiang7
  • 1 Nanshan District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen, 518054, China. , (China)
  • 2 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. , (China)
  • 3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA.
  • 4 Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen, 518055, China. , (China)
  • 5 School of Social Work, College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO, 63103, USA.
  • 6 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. [email protected] , (China)
  • 7 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Science and Pollution Research
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2021
Volume
28
Issue
28
Pages
37195–37203
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-13118-y
PMID: 33715123
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

There are relatively few studies that focus on the health effects of exposure to size-specific particles on respiratory mortality in China. We aimed to examine the association between different particle sizes and mortality from cause-specific respiratory diseases. We used a time series model with a quasi-Poisson link to investigate the relationship between different particle sizes and mortality from respiratory diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), pneumonia, and asthma in Shenzhen during 2014-2017. A total of 3716 mortalities due to respiratory diseases were collected. Both PM1 and PM2.5 were associated with mortality of overall respiratory diseases, COPD, and pneumonia. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM1 at lag03 was associated with a 12.21% (95% CI: 2.59%, 22.75%) increase in respiratory mortality, and each IQR increase in PM2.5 at lag03 corresponded to a 12.09% (95% CI: 2.52%, 22.56%) increase in respiratory mortality. PM1-2.5 was not associated with mortality from all-cause or cause-specific respiratory diseases. This study suggests that both PM1 and PM2.5 may increase the risk of mortality due to respiratory diseases in Shenzhen, China. © 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

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