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Acute consumption of p-synephrine does not enhance performance in sprint athletes.

Authors
  • Gutiérrez-Hellín, Jorge1, 1
  • Salinero, Juan José1, 1
  • Abían-Vicen, Javier1, 1
  • Areces, Francisco1, 1
  • Lara, Beatriz1, 1
  • Gallo, Cesar1, 1
  • Puente, Carlos1, 1
  • Del Coso, Juan1, 1
  • 1 Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Sport Science Institute, Camilo José Cela University, Madrid, Spain.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Publication Date
January 2016
Volume
41
Issue
1
Pages
63–69
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2015-0299
PMID: 26673246
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

P-Synephrine is a protoalkaloid widely used as an ergogenic aid in sports. This substance has been included in the World Anti-Doping Agency monitoring program, although scientific information about its effects on performance and athletes' well-being is scarce. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of p-synephrine to increase performance in sprint athletes. In a randomized and counterbalanced order, 13 experienced sprinters performed 2 acute experimental trials after the ingestion of p-synephrine (3 mg·kg(-1)) or after the ingestion of a placebo (control trial). Forty-five minutes after the ingestion of the substances, the sprinters performed a squat jump, a countermovement jump, a 15-s repeated jump test, and subsequently performed 60-m and 100-m simulated sprint competitions. Self-reported questionnaires were used to assess side-effect prevalence. In comparison with the control trial, the ingestion of p-synephrine did not change countermovement jump height (37.4 ± 4.2 vs 36.7 ± 3.3 cm, respectively; P = 0.52), squat jump height (34.4 ± 3.6 vs 33.9 ± 3.7 cm; P = 0.34), or average 15-s repeated jumps height (31.8 ± 4.1 vs 32.2 ± 3.6 cm; P = 0.18). P-Synephrine did not modify maximal running speed during the 60-m (9.0 ± 0.5 vs 9.0 ± 0.4 m·s(-1), respectively; P = 0.55) and 100-m sprint competitions (8.8 ± 0.5 vs 8.8 ± 0.5 m·s(-1), respectively; P = 0.92). The ingestion of p-synephrine did not alter the prevalence of headache, gastrointestinal discomforts, muscle pain, or insomnia during the hours following the tests. Acute consumption of 3 mg·kg(-1) of p-synephrine was ineffective to increase performance in competitive sprint athletes. Moreover, p-synephrine did not increase the occurrence of side effects after the competition.

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