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Acute consumption of p-synephrine does not enhance performance in sprint athletes.

Authors
  • Gutiérrez-Hellín, Jorge1, 1
  • Salinero, Juan José1, 1
  • Abían-Vicen, Javier1, 1
  • Areces, Francisco1, 1
  • Lara, Beatriz1, 1
  • Gallo, Cesar1, 1
  • Puente, Carlos1, 1
  • Del Coso, Juan1, 1
  • 1 Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Sport Science Institute, Camilo José Cela University, Madrid, Spain. , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Publication Date
January 2016
Volume
41
Issue
1
Pages
63–69
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2015-0299
PMID: 26673246
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

P-Synephrine is a protoalkaloid widely used as an ergogenic aid in sports. This substance has been included in the World Anti-Doping Agency monitoring program, although scientific information about its effects on performance and athletes' well-being is scarce. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of p-synephrine to increase performance in sprint athletes. In a randomized and counterbalanced order, 13 experienced sprinters performed 2 acute experimental trials after the ingestion of p-synephrine (3 mg·kg(-1)) or after the ingestion of a placebo (control trial). Forty-five minutes after the ingestion of the substances, the sprinters performed a squat jump, a countermovement jump, a 15-s repeated jump test, and subsequently performed 60-m and 100-m simulated sprint competitions. Self-reported questionnaires were used to assess side-effect prevalence. In comparison with the control trial, the ingestion of p-synephrine did not change countermovement jump height (37.4 ± 4.2 vs 36.7 ± 3.3 cm, respectively; P = 0.52), squat jump height (34.4 ± 3.6 vs 33.9 ± 3.7 cm; P = 0.34), or average 15-s repeated jumps height (31.8 ± 4.1 vs 32.2 ± 3.6 cm; P = 0.18). P-Synephrine did not modify maximal running speed during the 60-m (9.0 ± 0.5 vs 9.0 ± 0.4 m·s(-1), respectively; P = 0.55) and 100-m sprint competitions (8.8 ± 0.5 vs 8.8 ± 0.5 m·s(-1), respectively; P = 0.92). The ingestion of p-synephrine did not alter the prevalence of headache, gastrointestinal discomforts, muscle pain, or insomnia during the hours following the tests. Acute consumption of 3 mg·kg(-1) of p-synephrine was ineffective to increase performance in competitive sprint athletes. Moreover, p-synephrine did not increase the occurrence of side effects after the competition.

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