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Activated carbon fiber for heterogeneous activation of persulfate: implication for the decolorization of azo dye

Authors
  • Chen, Jiabin1
  • Hong, Wei1
  • Huang, Tianyin1
  • Zhang, Liming1
  • Li, Wenwei2
  • Wang, Ying1
  • 1 Suzhou University of Science and Technology, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Suzhou, 215001, China , Suzhou (China)
  • 2 University of Science and Technology of China, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hefei, 230026, China , Hefei (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Science and Pollution Research
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 13, 2016
Volume
23
Issue
18
Pages
18564–18574
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11356-016-7015-4
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Activated carbon fiber (ACF) was used as a green catalyst to activate persulfate (PS) for oxidative decolorization of azo dye. ACF demonstrated a higher activity than activated carbon (AC) to activate PS to decolorize Orange G (OG). The decolorization efficiency of OG increased as ACF loading, PS dosage, and temperature increased. OG decolorization followed a pseudo first-order kinetics, and the activation energy was 40.902 kJ/mol. pH had no apparent effect on OG decolorization. Radical quenching experiments with various radical scavengers (e.g., alcohols, phenol) showed that radical-induced decolorization of OG took place on the surface of ACF, and both SO4·− and HO· were responsible for OG decolorization. The impact of inorganic salts was also evaluated because they are important compositions of dye wastewater. Cl− and SO42− exhibited a promoting effect on OG decolorization, and the accelerating rate increased with elevating dosage of ions. Addition of Cl− and SO42− could increase the adsorption of OG on ACF surface, thus favorable for OG decolorization caused by the surface-bound SO4·− and HO·. Conversely, HCO3− and humic acid (HA) slightly inhibited OG decolorization. The azo band and naphthalene ring on OG were remarkably destructed to other intermediates and finally mineralized to CO2 and H2O.

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