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Actions and the Self: I Give, Therefore I am?

Authors
  • Regner, Tobias1
  • Matthey, Astrid2, 3
  • 1 Department of Economics, University of Jena, Jena , (Germany)
  • 2 Economic and Social Environmental Issues, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena , (Germany)
  • 3 Umweltbundesamt/German Environment Agency, Dessau-Roßlau , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Psychology
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Aug 10, 2021
Volume
12
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.684078
PMID: 34447331
PMCID: PMC8382956
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Psychology
  • Original Research
License
Unknown

Abstract

Self-signaling models predict less selfish behavior in a probabilistic giving setting as individuals are expected to invest in a pro-social identity. However, there is also substantial evidence that people tend to exploit situational excuses for selfish choices (for instance, uncertainty) and behave more selfishly. We contrast these two motivations (identity management and self-deception) experimentally in order to test which one is more prevalent in a reciprocal giving setting. Trustees' back transfer choices are elicited for five different transfer levels of the trustor. Moreover, we ask trustees to provide their back transfer schedule for different scenarios that vary the implementation probability of the back transfer. This design allows us to identify subjects who reciprocate and analyze how these reciprocators respond when self-image relevant factors are varied. Our results indicate that self-deception is prevalent when subjects make the back transfer choice. Twice as many subjects seem to exploit situational excuses than subjects who appear to invest in a pro-social identity. JEL classifications : C72, C91, D80, D91

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