Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Acorrelation study between histological results and thyroid ultrasound findings. The TI-RADS classification.

Authors
  • García-Moncó Fernández, Carlos1
  • Serrano-Moreno, Clara2
  • Donnay-Candil, Sergio2
  • Carrero-Alvaro, Juan3
  • 1 Servicio de Radiodiagnóstico, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, España. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, España.
  • 3 Servicio de Radiodiagnóstico, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, España.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Endocrinologia, diabetes y nutricion
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2018
Volume
65
Issue
4
Pages
206–212
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.endinu.2017.11.015
PMID: 29475812
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
Spanish
License
Unknown

Abstract

There are several classifications based on thyroid ultrasound for selecting suspected malignant thyroid nodules. The Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (TI-RADS) classification proposed by Horvath in 2009 includes 6 categories. To assess the sensitivity of the TI-RADS classification for diagnosing thyroid nodules. A retrospective study of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy at our hospital (n=263) from September 2013 to December 2015. After thyroidectomy, histological results were correlated to the ultrasound findings reported. Of the 263 study patients, 75 (28.5%) were diagnosed with thyroid cancer and 188 (71.5%) with benign disease. Correlation of histological results with preoperative ultrasound reports showed an initial sensitivity of 65%. After excluding 15 patients diagnosed with occult microcarcinoma, sensitivity increased to 81.6%. The ultrasound images from 11 false negatives cases were then reassessed by a radiologist who knew histological diagnosis and reclassified 10 of them as TI-RADS≥4. This procedure could have increased sensitivity up to 98.3%. Although the sensitivity initially found in our study using the TI-RADS scale was relatively low, the value markedly improved when patients with occult microcarcinoma were excluded. Thus, use of the TI-RADS scale would allow for an adequate selection of patients amenable to fine needle aspiration of the nodule. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times