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Acipimox increases glucose disposal in normal man independent of changes in plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentration and whole-body lipid oxidation rate.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Metabolism
0026-0495
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
42
Issue
3
Pages
308–314
Identifiers
PMID: 8487648
Source
Medline

Abstract

The short-term administration of a nicotinic acid analogue (acipimox) increases insulin sensitivity and consequently glucose disposal, both in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in patients with cirrhosis. This effect has been attributed to a decrease in plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels and fatty acid oxidation rates, and a corresponding increase in carbohydrate oxidation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether acipimox influenced glucose disposal independent of changes in lipid metabolism. Seven normal men (age, 31 +/- 4 years; body mass index, 23.2 +/- 1.8 kg.m-2; fat-free mass [FFM], 66.8 +/- 4.2 kg) were studied on two separate occasions with hyperinsulinemic (0.06 U.kg FFM-1.h-1) euglycemic clamps (duration, 150 minutes). A primed (150 U), continuous (0.4 U.kg-1.min-1) infusion of heparin together with 10% intralipid (25 mL.h-1) was infused in both studies from -90 to 150 minutes to maintain comparable levels of plasma NEFA and lipid oxidation rates. Acipimox (500-mg capsules) or placebo were administered orally in a double-blind random fashion at t = -90 and t = 0 minutes. Whole-body lipid and carbohydrate oxidation were measured in the last 30 minutes of both the basal (preclamp) period (-30 to 0 minutes) and the clamp period (120 to 150 minutes).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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