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Acetosoluble Soil Phases Containing Heavy Metals (Distinguished Based on Dynamic Extractograms)

Authors
  • Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.1
  • Savichev, A. T.2, 3
  • 1 Department of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
  • 2 Geological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119017, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
  • 3 Dokuchaev Soil Science Institute, Moscow, 119017, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Moscow University Soil Science Bulletin
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2021
Volume
76
Issue
4
Pages
177–185
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3103/S0147687421040086
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Thematic Issue on Urban Soils
License
Yellow

Abstract

AbstractSoil pollution with heavy metals (HMs) was studied using sequential static chemical extraction methods. Amounts of heavy metals extracted by acetic acid were determined. New equipment for dynamic HM extraction makes it possible to produce extractograms, thus opening up new possibilities: the number of particle groups differing in resistance to a given reagent and statistical parameters of each of these particle groups can now be determined. A new extractogram interpretation technique is proposed: an extractogram is deconvoluted into a series of asymmetric Gaussian functions corresponding to separate groups of particles acting as HM carriers. The following statistical parameters of the Gaussians were analyzed: relative resistance of each particle group to acetic acid, their dispersion (D), asymmetry (As), and excess (Ex). Statistical parameters of Ca–Mg particles acting as HM carriers in urban soils indicate their high heterogeneity in resistance to acetic acid in comparison with particles in nonurban soils. A probable reason behind the difference between urban and nonurban soils is different composition of their Ca–Mg minerals. In nonurban soils, they are mostly represented by carbonates; while urban, initially noncalcareous soils are contaminated with construction waste containing Ca–Mg (cement, lime, and asbestos) and also contain secondary carbonates formed from Ca–Mg waste. Acetosoluble urban pollutants belong to such groups of minerals as technogenic calcium and magnesium hydroxides, silicates, and aluminates; this sharply distinguishes them from natural carbonates in terms of chemical properties. The abundance of chemical particles acting as HM carriers determines the diversity and heterogeneity of acetosoluble particles in urban soils.

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