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Access to Higher Education and Adolescent Fertility in Chile.

Authors
  • Salinas, Viviana1
  • Jorquera-Samter, Valentina2
  • Wiegand-Cruz, Pilar3
  • 1 Viviana Salinas, Instituto de Sociología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Correo 22, Macul, Santiago, Chile. , (Chile)
  • 2 Valentina Jorquera-Samter, Instituto de Sociología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Correo 22, Macul, Santiago, Chile. , (Chile)
  • 3 Pilar Wiegand-Cruz, PhD candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RQ, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Studies in family planning
Publication Date
Dec 06, 2023
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/sifp.12254
PMID: 38054525
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study investigates gender differences in the association between adolescent fertility and the likelihood of initiating higher education among young Chilean men and women. We adopt an entropy balancing strategy to estimate the association between adolescent fertility and the likelihood of starting higher education while accounting for potential selection into early childbearing due to socioeconomic status and prior academic achievement. We use data from official national registers that cover a cohort of Chilean students who attended publicly funded schools and who successfully completed secondary schooling between 2011 and 2022. Our results indicate that adolescent mothers are 15 percentage points less likely to initiate higher education than their peers who did not give birth during adolescence. In comparison, teenage fathers are 20 percentage points less likely to do so than their childless counterparts. Our findings stand in contrast to previously identified disadvantage patterns for secondary school completion, whereby adolescent fertility more significantly hinders schooling completion for women relative to men. We contend that this reversal may be related to traditional gender-role expectations in Chile, which encourage young fathers to act as providers and, therefore, may be prevented from continuing on their education path into tertiary studies. © 2023 The Population Council, Inc.

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