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Acceptability of a peer-led self-management program for people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in regional Southern Tasmania in Australia: A qualitative study.

Authors
  • Mudzingwa, Innocent Tawanda1
  • Ayton, Jennifer E2
  • 1 Physiotherapy Department, Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Tasmanian School of Medicine College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chronic illness
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2024
Volume
20
Issue
1
Pages
96–104
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/17423953231163450
PMID: 36895141
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

People living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in regional communities experience a higher disease burden and have poorer access to support services. This study sought to investigate the acceptability of a peer-led self-management program (SMP) in regional Tasmania, Australia. This descriptive qualitative study, underpinned by interpretivism used semi-structured one-to-one interviews to gather data to explore COPD patients' views of peer-led SMPs. Purposeful sampling recruited a sample of 8 women and 2 men. Data was analysed using a thematic approach. The three final themes, 'Normality and Living with the disease', a 'Platform for sharing' and 'Communication mismatch' suggest that peer-led SMPs could offer an opportunity to share experiences. The themes also suggest that COPD often manifested as a deviation from 'normal life'. Communication was often felt to be ambiguous leading to tension between the health experts and people living with the condition. Peer-led SMP has the potential to provide the much-needed support for people living with COPD in regional communities. This will ensure that they are empowered to live with the condition with dignity and respect. Benefits of exchanging ideas and socialisation should not be ignored and may enhance sustainability of SMPs.

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