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Acceptability and feasibility of a computer-based application to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians describe their alcohol consumption.

Authors
  • Lee, Ks Kylie1, 2
  • Conigrave, James H1
  • Al Ansari, Mustafa1
  • Wilson, Scott1, 3
  • Perry, Jimmy3
  • Zheng, Catherine1
  • Freeburn, Bradley4
  • Room, Robin2
  • Callinan, Sarah2
  • Hayman, Noel5, 6, 7
  • Chikritzhs, Tanya8
  • Slade, Tim9
  • Gray, Dennis8
  • Conigrave, Katherine M1, 10
  • 1 The University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Discipline of Addiction Medicine, Indigenous Health and Substance Use, NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Indigenous Health and Alcohol, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 La Trobe University, Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (ADAC), South Australia, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Aboriginal Medical Service Redfern Co-op Limited, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 Southern Queensland Centre of Excellence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care, Queensland, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 6 School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 7 School of Medicine, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 8 Curtin University, Health Sciences, National Drug Research Institute, Western Australia, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 9 University of New South Wales, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 10 Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Drug Health Services, Sydney Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of ethnicity in substance abuse
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
20
Issue
1
Pages
16–33
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/15332640.2019.1579144
PMID: 30887909
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

We examined acceptability and feasibility of a tablet application ("App") to record self-reported alcohol consumption among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Four communities (1 urban; 3 regional/remote) tested the App, with 246 adult participants (132 males, 114 females). The App collected (a) completion time; (b) participant feedback; (c) staff observations. Three research assistants were interviewed. Only six (1.4%) participants reported that the App was "hard" to use. Participants appeared to be engaged and to require minimal assistance; nearly half verbally reflected on their drinking or drinking of others. The App has potential for surveys, screening, or health promotion.

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