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Acceptability of an Adapted HIV Prevention Intervention for Native American Adolescents.

Authors
  • Lee, Crystal1
  • Thompson-Robinson, Melva2
  • Dodge-Francis, Carolee3
  • 1 Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Global Center for Children & Families, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
  • 2 Center for Health Disparities Research, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada.
  • 3 American Indian Research and Education Center, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada. , (India)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS education and prevention : official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2018
Volume
30
Issue
1
Pages
72–84
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1521/aeap.2018.30.1.72
PMID: 29481297
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Relatively few HIV evidence-based interventions (EBIs) among Native Americans have been developed, adapted, evaluated, and/or published in the scientific literature. An adolescent HIV EBI was adapted in three phases: (1) securing input from a Native American Advisory Board; (2) modifying the EBI to be more consistent with Native American culture; and (3) conducing a pilot with 14 Native American adolescents to examine acceptability and cultural congruence between the adapted intervention and the youth's culture based on Likert-scale ratings and a focus group. The adaptations included diverse Native American social and cultural stories that assisted with responsible decision-making skills. The adolescents consistently rated each intervention session as highly acceptable. A difference in knowledge from pre-survey (M = 13.93, SD = 3.08) to post-survey (M = 17.14, SD = 2.25) was statistically significant; t(13) = 4.166, p < .0005. The adapted curriculum did appear culturally responsive based on the pilot test results.

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