Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Ability differentials between nations are unlikely to disappear.

Authors
  • Woodley, Michael A
  • Meisenberg, Gerhard
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American psychologist
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2012
Volume
67
Issue
6
Pages
501–502
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1037/a0029650
PMID: 22963425
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Comments on the original article, "Intelligence: New findings and theoretical developments," by R. E. Nisbett, J. Aronson, C. Blair, W. Dickens, J. Flynn, D. F. Halpern, and E. Turkheimer (see record 2011-30298-001). This comment challenges Nisbett et al's argument that Flynn effect gains will eliminate cross-national IQ inequalities "by the end of the 21st century and falsify the hypothesis that some nations lack the intelligence to fully industrialize" (p. 140). The present authors find that this optimism is not justified by the evidence. In Europe and the United States, Flynn effects are indeed rare in cohorts born after about 1980. Furthermore, it is necessary to distinguish between accelerated childhood development and higher adult intelligence.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times