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Why are criminals less educated than non-criminals? Evidence from a cohort of young Australian twins

Authors
Publisher
CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis
Publication Date
Disciplines
  • Economics
  • Education

Abstract

Webbink, D., Koning, P., Vujić, S. and Martin, N. G. (2008) Why are criminals less educated than non-criminals? Evidence from a cohort of young Australian twins. Discussion Paper. CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, The Hague, the Netherlands. Link to official URL (if available): http://www.cpb.nl/sites/default/files/publicaties/download/why-are- criminals-less-educated-non-criminals-evidence-cohort-young- australian-twins.pdf Opus: University of Bath Online Publication Store http://opus.bath.ac.uk/ This version is made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the reference above. See http://opus.bath.ac.uk/ for usage policies. Please scroll down to view the document. CPB Discussion Paper No 114 November 2008 Why are criminals less educated than non- criminals? Evidence from a cohort of young Australian twins Dinand Webbink, Pierre Koning, Sunčica Vujić, Nick Martin (QIMR Brisbane) The responsibility for the contents of this CPB Discussion Paper remains with the author(s) 2 CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis Van Stolkweg 14 P.O. Box 80510 2508 GM The Hague, the Netherlands Telephone +31 70 338 33 80 Telefax +31 70 338 33 50 Internet www.cpb.nl ISBN 978-90-5833-382-7 3 Abstract in English Many studies find a strong negative association between crime and education. This raises the question whether crime reduces investment in human capital or whether education reduces criminal activity. This paper investigates this question by using fixed effect estimation on data of Australian twins. We find that early arrests (before the age of 18) have a strong effect on human capital accumulation. In addition, we find that education decreases crime. However, controlling for early arrests and early behaviour problems reduces the estimated effect of human capital on crime to less than on third of the

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