Affordable Access

Abdominal surgery after lung transplantation.

Authors
  • 1
  • 1 Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American surgeon
Publication Date
Volume
76
Issue
10
Pages
1130–1134
Identifiers
PMID: 21105627
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Among 450 patients who underwent lung transplantation (LuT) between April 1994 and April 2009 at a single academic hospital, 75 received surgical consultation, and 52 underwent 65 abdominal operations. Operations included colectomy (17), cholecystectomy (14), exploratory laparotomy (10), ulcer repair (five), hernia repair (four), Nissen fundoplication (four), pancreatic debridement (four), ostomy takedown (two), drainage of intra-abdominal abscess (two), and major vascular procedure, gastrostomy, splenectomy, fascial closure, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, and small bowel resection (one each). Fourteen patients (27%) died within 30 days of surgery. On univariate analysis, age, race, comorbidities, history of previous abdominal surgery, transplant type, and timing of surgery after transplant were similar between the patients who survived and died. On multivariate analysis, emergent surgery, multiple medical comorbidities, and male gender were predictive of 30-day mortality (P < or = 0.05). Ulcer repair, major vascular procedures, pancreatic surgery, splenectomy, and exploratory laparotomy were associated with > or =50 per cent 30-day mortality. This is the largest series reporting outcomes of abdominal operations after LuT. Elective operations in LuT patients are safe, whereas emergent operations carry an extremely high short-term mortality rate. Aggressive prophylaxis for ulcer disease and early elective intervention for potential surgical problems, such as gallstones and uncomplicated diverticulitis, should be considered.

Statistics

Seen <100 times