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Venous Interruption for Pulmonary Embolism: The Illustrative Case of Richard M. Nixon

Authors
Journal
Annals of Vascular Surgery
0890-5096
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
11
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s100169900066
Keywords
  • Papers Presented At The Fifteenth Annual Meeting Of The Southern California Vascular Surgical Societ
Disciplines
  • Medicine
  • Political Science

Abstract

This politically prominent patient was seen in consultation on October 26, 1974 because of chronic venous thrombosis and a recent pulmonary embolism. His problems had begun in 1965 when he developed venous thrombosis in the left leg after a lengthy trip by air. His treatment had been sporadic and his compliance with treatment less than satisfactory. Because of detailed phlebography demonstrating (1) no clots in the veins of the right leg, (2) extensive loose lying clot filling the superficial, deep, and external iliac veins on the left, and (3) because of prior difficulties with patient compliance unilateral interruption of the left external iliac vein above the top of the clot was proposed. Despite some postoperative complications, the patient made a full recovery and lived 19 years on warfarin therapy before death from unrelated causes. He suffered no significant edema or other postphlebitic symptoms in the affected leg. The history of the use of venous interruption under these circumstances is reviewed to justify the operation that was performed.

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