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Functional neuroanatomical correlates of eye movements during rapid eye movement sleep in depressed patients

Authors
Journal
Psychiatry Research Neuroimaging
0925-4927
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
130
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2003.12.003
Keywords
  • Rapid Eye Movements
  • Cerebral Glucose Metabolism
  • Rem Sleep
  • Depression
  • Arousal
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract In depressed patients, REM density, or the number of rapid eye movements (REMs) per minute of REM sleep, is a correlate of depression severity and clinical outcomes. We investigated the functional neuroanatomical correlates of average REM counts (RC), an automated analog of REM density, in depression. Thirteen medication-free depressed patients underwent all night polysomnography and positron emission tomography (PET) scans using [ 18F]fluoro-2-deoxy- d-glucose ([ 18F] FDG) during REM sleep. Regression analyses were conducted with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM-99). Average RC significantly and positively correlated with relative regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc) bilaterally in the striate cortex, the posterior parietal cortices, and in the medial and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. Average RC were negatively correlated with rCMRglc in areas corresponding bilaterally to the lateral occipital cortex, cuneus, temporal cortices, and parahippocampal gyri. The areas where average RC was positively correlated with rCMRglc appear to constitute a diffuse cortical system involved in the regulation of emotion-induced arousal. The observed pattern of correlations suggests that average RC may be a marker of hypofrontality during REM sleep in depressed patients.

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