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Horseshoe adrenal gland in association with asplenia: presentation of six new cases and review of the literature

Authors
Journal
Pediatric Radiology
0301-0449
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Disciplines
  • Ecology

Abstract

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Pediatr Radiol (2002) 32: 778–782 DOI 10.1007/s00247-002-0773-9 Peter J. Strouse Jack O. Haller Walter E. Berdon Mark A. Rosovsky Richard D. Bellah Mason Barr Jr. Horseshoe adrenal gland in association with asplenia: presentation of six new cases and review of the literature Received: 11 December 2001 Accepted: 29 March 2002 Published online: 27 July 2002 � Springer-Verlag 2002 P.J. Strouse (&) Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Room F3503, University of Michigan Medical Center, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0252, USA E-mail: [email protected] Tel.: +1-734-7632570 Fax: +1-734-7649351 J.O. Haller Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY, USA W.E. Berdon Department of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY, USA M.A. Rosovsky Department of Radiology, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey, USA R.D. Bellah Department of Radiology, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA M. Barr Jr. Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA M. Barr Jr. Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA M. Barr Jr. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract Background: Asplenia syndrome is a form of heterotaxy characterized by bilateral right- sidedness. Congenital fusion of the adrenal glands (‘‘horseshoe adrenal gland’’) is a less common feature of asplenia syndrome, most instances of which have been found at autop- sy. Purpose: To present clinical and imaging features of infants diag- nosed with asplenia syndrome and horseshoe adrenal gland. Materials and methods: Six infants with asplenia syndrome were identified as having a horseshoe adrenal gland. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed to determine clinical presentation, associated anomalies, and outcome. The literature was re- v

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