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Comparison of Bacteriostatic Normal Saline and Lidocaine Used as Intradermal Anesthesia for the Placement of Intravenous Lines

Authors
Journal
Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing
1089-9472
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
21
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jopan.2006.05.007
Disciplines
  • Design

Abstract

Pain with intravenous (IV) insertion is a common fear for preoperative patients. As perianesthesia nurses, we take the necessary measures to minimize the discomfort and anxiety of our patients. Several research studies have found the use of bacteriostatic normal saline (BNS) to produce a less painful, yet equally effective, safer, and less expensive alternative method for intradermal anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a difference existed in pain with intradermal injection and pain with venipuncture when intradermal anesthesia was used. Using an experimental design, 221 participants were randomly assigned by lottery convenience sampling into three groups: lidocaine, BNS, and no local anesthesia. Patients were asked to quantify their pain/discomfort level after the intradermal injection and IV insertion using a modified visual analog scale. Significant findings ( P = < .05) indicated that BNS was less painful on injection, and both BNS and lidocaine were effective as local anesthetics for IV insertion. This study helped perianesthesia nurses and patients in determining which method of IV insertion is more effective and reasonably acceptable to ensure patient comfort, satisfaction, and positive outcomes.

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