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A single amino acid change in a myelin basic protein peptide confers the capacity to prevent rather than induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an experimental demyelinating disease of rodents. In (PL/J x SJL) F1 mice, it is induced by immunization with the myelin basic protein peptide Ac1-11. Ac1-11 [4A], a myelin basic protein peptide analog with a single amino acid substitution, (i) binds to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules and stimulates encephalitogenic T cells in vitro better than Ac1-11, (ii) is nonimmunogenic and nonencephalitogenic in vivo in (PL/J x SJL)F1 mice, (iii) prevents EAE when administered before or at the time of immunization with Ac1-11, and (iv) prevents EAE when administered later, near the time of disease onset. Initial studies suggest that Ac1-11 [4A] does not prevent EAE by competitive inhibition or by activation of regulatory cells. Thus, substitution of a single amino acid in a myelin basic protein peptide confers the capacity to prevent rather than induce EAE, even after peptide-specific encephalitogenic T cells have been activated.

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