A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF SUSTAINED VECTOR SURVEILLANCE FOLLOWING COMMUNITY-WIDE INSECTICIDE APPLICATION ON TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI INFECTION OF DOGS AND CATS IN RURAL NORTHWESTERN ARGENTINA

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A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF SUSTAINED VECTOR SURVEILLANCE FOLLOWING COMMUNITY-WIDE INSECTICIDE APPLICATION ON TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI INFECTION OF DOGS AND CATS IN RURAL NORTHWESTERN ARGENTINA

Publication Date
Oct 01, 2006
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Medicine
License
Unknown

Abstract

Domestic dogs were used as natural sentinels to assess prospectively the long-term impact of selective, community-based spraying with pyrethroid insecticides after community-wide spraying on transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in rural villages under surveillance between 1992 and 2002. In 2000 and 2002 light infestations by Triatoma infestans were recorded, and 523 dogs and cats were examined serologically or by xenodiagnosis. The prevalence of T. cruzi infection in dogs decreased from 65% at baseline to 8.9% and 4.7% at 7.5 and 10 years after sustained vector surveil-lance, respectively. The average annual force of infection dropped 260-fold from 72.7 per 100 dog-years at baseline to <0.3% in 2002, as determined prospectively and retrospectively from the age-prevalence curve of native dogs born during surveillance. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that prevalent cases in dogs in 2000 and 2002 were associated positively and significantly with the peak number of T. infestans caught in domestic areas at the dog's compound during its lifetime. The sustained decline in T. cruzi infections in dogs and cats is the result of selective, community-based insecticide spraying that kept the abundance of infected T. infestans at marginal levels, fast host population turnover, and low immigration rates from areas with active transmission.

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