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Positive and negative health care experiences of people with HIV/AIDS in Taiwan: A qualitative study

Authors
Publisher
Purdue University
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Health Sciences
  • Public Health|Sociology
  • Individual And Family Studies|Sociology
  • Public And Social Welfare
Disciplines
  • Philosophy

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate the health care experience of people with HIV/AIDS (PWHA) in Taiwan. This study used a phenomenological approach. Participants were 14 PWHAs with an average age of 35.71 years, who had known their positive HIV status for an average of 2 years and 6 months. Four kinds of practices highlight participants' negative health care experience. The “out of touch” practice happens when participants perceive health care professionals as creating physical distance and unnecessary barriers and/or overly or inappropriately using universal precaution during encounters. The “out of mind” practice happens when participants perceive that health care professionals are insensitive and inconsiderate to their physical and emotional needs in delivering services. The “out of sight” practice happens when participants perceive health care professionals neglecting their needs or refusing to provide services to them. The “out of the way” practice happens when participants perceive health care professionals invading their privacy, overstepping personal boundaries, and/or making decisions for them, and/or breaching confidentiality. ^ Participants identified health care professionals' caring attitudes, professional expertise and four kinds of practices as critical aspects of their positive health care experiences. The “in touch” practice occurs when participants perceive health care professionals forthcoming and not using universal precaution during encounters. The “in mind” practice occurs when participants perceive health care professionals as sensitive and considerate of their physical and emotional needs in delivering services. The “in sight” practice occurs when participants perceive health care professionals providing them with health care based on their health care needs with no refusal of services because of their positive HIV status. The “in way/on track” practice occurs when participants perceive health care professionals providing the services they need which range from keeping confidentiality, providing information, acting as resources, to making the effort to provide timely care. ^ Participants responded to positive health care experiences with gratitude, actively engaging in self-care, and expressing appreciation to health care professionals. Participants either used “don't rock the boat” or “building defenses and finding alternatives” to counteract negative health care experiences. Participants provided valuable suggestions for improving the health care services. ^

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