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Involving Stakeholders in Health Services Research: Developing Alberta's Resident Classification System for Long Term Care Facilities

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Microsoft Word - wp 04-02 draft CHEPA WORKING PAPER SERIES Paper 04-02 Home Care in Australia: Some Lessons for Canada Christel A. Woodward, PhD NOT FOR CITATION OR QUOTATION WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF THE AUTHOR Home Care in Australia: Some Lessons for Canada Christel Woodward, PhD Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics McMaster University Cite as: Woodward CA. Home Care in Australia: Some Lessons for Canada. McMaster University Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper 04-02. July 2004. Acknowledgements I would like to thank all of the people who took time to discuss the Australian home and community care and aged care systems with me and shared their perspectives with me. Special thanks go to Anna Howe, who offered many valuable insights into HACC that she gained through her long association with and research about this program. Any inaccuracies that remain in the paper are mine. Home Care in Australia: Some Lessons for Canada CHEPA Working Paper 04-02 1 Home Care in Australia: Some Lessons for Canada Home care has been defined as “an array of services which enables clients, incapacitated in whole or part, to live at home, often with the effect of preventing, delaying or substitution for long term or acute care alternatives” (Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on Home Care, 1990). Pressure to establish a national home care program in Canada has mounted in the last fifteen years. In 1997, the National Forum on Health (1997) reported and indicated that home care is an important part of the health care system. This theme was repeated during the National Conference on Home Care in March of 1998, where having a national home care

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