Affordable Access

Publisher Website

EXPANDING THE LIVING RELATED DONOR POOL IN RENAL TRANSPLANTATION: USE OF MARGINAL DONORS

Authors
Journal
The Journal of Urology
0022-5347
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
163
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s0022-5347(05)67966-9
Keywords
  • Kidney
  • Transplantation
  • Living Donors
  • Kidney Transplantation
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Purpose: In a living related transplantation program it is not always possible to find an ideal donor. Sometimes the only available donor in the family has some benign disease or suboptimal renal anatomy or physiology, or is too old to be accepted and defined as a marginal donor. However, with proper screening the donor pool can be increased by accepting these marginal donors and treating the benign diseases which is beneficial to the donor. We evaluate the outcome of grafts from marginal donors. Materials and Methods: From July 1988 to August 1997, 581 live related transplantations were performed. Of the donors 52 were older than 60 years and 34 had associated benign renal or nonrenal anomaly or disease. These donors were accepted after thorough questioning and consultation with family members. The recipients of graft from elderly donors were evaluated for the number of rejections, serum creatinine at last followup and graft survival. Results: Of the recipients 52 received grafts from elderly donors with a mean age of 62.6 ± 3.7 years. Mean followup was 34.14 ± 0.7 months. The 2 and 5-year actuarial graft survival was 96% and 74%, respectively. Creatinine was normal (less than 1.5) in 37% of recipients and 1.5 to 2.5 mg.% in 46%. The rejection rate in postoperative month 1 was 29%. All donors underwent simultaneous surgery to treat the benign disease, and all did well after surgery. Conclusions: By accepting these marginal donors a 14.6% increase in the living related donor pool was achieved without compromising recipient or donor safety. Otherwise these recipients would have been forced to undergo unrelated transplantation or be maintained on dialysis, which is particularly difficult in a developing country. Donors with associated disease benefited from cure.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.