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Tuart seedling survival and growth in Yalgorup National Park

Authors
Publisher
Report for the Department of Conservation and Land Management
Publication Date
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Ecology

Abstract

http://tweaket.com/CPGenerator/?id=5006 MURDOCH RESEARCH REPOSITORY http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au This is the author's final version of the work, as accepted for publication following peer review but without the publisher's layout or pagination. So, T. , Ruthrof, K.X. and Dell, B. (2011) Seed and seedling responses to inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and root nodule bacteria: implications for restoration of degraded Mediterranean-type Tuart woodlands. Ecological Management & Restoration, 12 (2). pp. 157-160. http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/5006 Copyright © 2011 Ecological Society of Australia It is posted here for your personal use. No further distribution is permitted. http://tweaket.com/CPGenerator/?id=5006 1 of 1 26/08/2011 12:31 PM 1 Seed and seedling responses to inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and root nodule bacteria: implications for restoration of degraded Mediterranean-type Tuart woodlands Thea So1, Katinka X. Ruthrof2 and Bernard Dell2 (1School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia; 2 State Centre of Excellence for Climate Change and Forest and Woodland Health, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia). Key words: direct seeding, mycorrhizal fungi, root nodule bacteria, survival, growth. Summary Inoculation with beneficial soil microorganisms has the potential to enhance success of restoration, particularly in harsh Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTE’s). We investigated the effects of microorganisms (mycorrhizal fungi and root nodule bacteria) and planting material (seed and nursery-raised seedlings) on early establishment and growth of two key post-disturbance colonizing species with different life histories, life forms and functional types (Eucalyptus gomphocephala and Acacia saligna) under field conditions. Establishment and growth was monitored at 13 months, following the first MTE drought period. For E. gomphocephal

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